kakopsia
   The term kalopsia comes from the Greek words kakos (bad, unpleasant) and opsis (seeing). It is used to denote a negative affective connotation of sensory, illusory, and hallucinatory phenomena, in the sense that these are perceived as ugly, sinister, and/or menacing. The term kakopsia is used in opposition to *kalopsia (i.e. seeing things as beautiful, friendly, and/or comforting).
   References
   Critchley, M. (1949). Metamorphopsia of central origin. Transactions of the Ophthalmologic Society of the UK, 69, 111-121.

Dictionary of Hallucinations. . 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • complicated metamorphopsia —    The term complicated metamorphopsia comes from the Latin verb complicare (to fold together), and the Greek words metamorphoun (to change the form) and opsis (seeing). It is used to denote a type of *metamorphopsia (i.e. a visual distortion)… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • kalopsia —    The term kalopsia comes from the Greek words kalos (beautiful) and opsis (seeing). It is used to denote the aesthetic overrating of sensory, illusory, and hallucinatory phenomena, in the sense that these are perceived as beautiful, friendly,… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

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