mirrored self-misidentification
   A term that refers to a misidentification syndrome in which the affected individual is unable to identify his or her mirror image as oneself. The concomitant staring behaviour in front of a mirror or other reflecting surface is referred to as the * mirror sign. Theoretically, mirrored self-misidentification may be at once delusional and illusory in nature. For example, individuals with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease may attempt to converse with their mirror image and ask why that person is being held prisoner or become annoyed at the idea of being followed by the person they perceive in the mirror. A related - but extremely rare - phenomenon is *negative autoscopy, characterized by the failure to perceive one's mirror image while looking into a mirror.
   References
   Dening, T.R., Berrios, G.E. (1994). Autoscopic phenomena. British Journal of Psychiatry, 165, 808-817.
   Rubin, E.H., Drevets, W.C., Burke, W.J. (1988). The nature of psychotic symptoms in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, 1, 16-20.

Dictionary of Hallucinations. . 2010.

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  • Mirrored-self misidentification — is the delusional belief that one s reflection in a mirror is some other person (often believed to be someone who is following one around). Often people who suffer from this delusion are not delusional about anything else. It is considered a… …   Wikipedia

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  • mirror sign —    Also known as signe du miroir and Capgras syndrome for the mirror image. All three terms are used to denote the inability to recognize oneself in a reflecting surface such as a window or a mirror, while the ability to recognize others in such… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

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  • negative autoscopy —    Also known as negative heautoscopy and asomatoscopy. The term negative autoscopy is used to denote a variant of *autoscopy (i.e. the perception of a hallucinated image of oneself) characterized by the transient failure to perceive one s own… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

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