objective polyopia
   The term 'objective' polyopia was introduced in or shortly before 1928 by the German-American biological psychologist and philosopher Heinrich Klüver (1897-1979) to denote the perception of multiple identical images in regular visual perception (i.e. what is usually referred to as *polyopia). Klüver uses the term 'objective' polyopia in opposition to the terms * hallucinatory polyopia and *imaginal polyopia.
   References
   Klüver, H. (1966). Mescal and Mechanisms of hallucinations. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Dictionary of Hallucinations. . 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • polyopia —    Also known as polyopsia. Both terms stem from the Greek words polus (much, many) and opsis (seeing). They refer to the perception of an image that repeats itself within the visual field. The ensuing coexistence of various similar images within …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • imaginal polyopia —    The term imaginal polyopia is indebted to the Latin verb imaginari (to copy, to imitate, to picture) and the Greek words polus (much, many) and opsis (seeing). It was introduced in or shortly before 1928 by the German American biological… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • hallucinatory polyopia —    The term hallucinatory polyopia is indebted to the Greek words polus (much, many) and opsis (seeing). It was introduced in or shortly before 1928 by the German American biological psychologist and philosopher Heinrich Klüver (1897 1979) to… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

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