olfactory reference syndrome
   The term olfactory reference syndrome is indebted to the Latin verbs ol(e)facere (to smell) and referre (to report, to convey, to refer). It was introduced in or shortly before 1971 by the Canadian neurologist William E.M. Pryse-Phillips to denote a condition characterized by * olfactory hallucinations which the affected individual believes to be emanating from his or her own body (i.e. an *intrinsic olfactory hallucination). The hallucinated smells reported by individuals with an olfactory reference syndrome are typically excretory or sexual in nature (i.e. sweat, faeces, urine, sperm, menstrual blood, etc.). A hallucinated foul breath emanating from the oral cavity is referred to as * hallucinatory halitosis, so as to distinguish it from an objectifiable foul breath (i.e. halitosis). The term olfactory reference syndrome is used when there is no insight into the hallucinatory nature of the foul odour, and when the affected individual develops delusions of reference on the basis of this symptom, to the extent that he or she believes persons in their environment are showing signs of aversion or disgust. As noted by Pryse-Phillips on the basis of a study of a group of 137 individuals with olfactory hallucinations and varying clinical diagnoses, individuals with an olfactory reference syndrome "displayed a marked 'contrite' reaction in response. They washed their bodies and changed their clothes to excess, and tended to withdraw from their environment, particularly from social events". According to Pryse-Phillips, a similar behavioural pattern in individuals suffering from bodily hallucinated smells was reported as early as 1891 by an American author named C.S. Potts. Although Pryse-Phillips distinguishes the olfactory reference syndrome from olfactory hallucinations occurring in the context of depressive disorder, he suggests that it has a significant potential to develop into a reactive type of depression.
   References
   Pryse-Phillips, W. (1971). An olfactory reference syndrome. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 47, 484-509.
   Spitzer, M. (1988). Halluzinationen. Ein Beitrag zur allgemeinen und klinischen Psychopathologie. Berlin: Springer-Verlag.

Dictionary of Hallucinations. . 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Olfactory Reference Syndrome — (ORS) (also referred to as Autodysomophobia[1]) is a psychiatric condition in which the affected person is excessively preoccupied by the concern that one s body odor is foul or unpleasant. This disorder is often accompanied by shame,… …   Wikipedia

  • olfactory hallucination —    Also known as phantosmia, phantom smell, and hallucination of smell. The term olfactory hallucination is indebted to the Latin verb ol(e)facere, which means to smell. Using source localization as a guiding principle, olfactory hallucinations… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • intrinsic olfactory hallucination —    Also known as bodily hallucinated smell. The term intrinsic olfactory hallucination is indebted to the Latin words intrinsecus (within, on the inside) and ol(e)facere (to smell). It was introduced in or shortly before 1971 by the Canadian… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • extrinsic olfactory hallucination —    The term extrinsic olfactory hallucination is indebted to the Latin words extrinsecus (outside), and ol(e)facere (to smell). It was introduced in or shortly before 1971 by the Canadian neurologist William E.M. Pryse Phillips to denote an… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • ORS — olfactory reference syndrome; oral rehydration solution; oral surgery, oral surgeon; Orthopaedic Research Society; orthopedic surgeon, orthopedic surgery; oxygen radical scavengers * * * ORS abbr oral rehydration salts; oral rehydration solution… …   Medical dictionary

  • ORS — • olfactory reference syndrome; • oral rehydration solution; • oral surgery, oral surgeon; • Orthopaedic Research Society; • orthopedic surgeon, orthopedic surgery; • oxygen radical scavengers …   Dictionary of medical acronyms & abbreviations

  • Olfaction — Human olfactory system. 1: Olfactory bulb 2: Mitral cells 3: Bone 4: Nasal epithelium 5: Glomerulus (olfaction) 6: Olfactory receptor cells Olfaction (also known as olfactics; adjectival form: olfactory ) is the sense of smell. This sense is… …   Wikipedia

  • Body dysmorphic disorder — Classification and external resources ICD 10 F45.2 ICD 9 300.7 …   Wikipedia

  • Disability — Disabled redirects here. For the poem by Wilfred Owen, see Disabled (poem). Disabilities redirects here. For the Middle Age restrictions, see Disabilities (Jewish). Disability …   Wikipedia

  • Halitosis — ICD 10 R19.6 ICD 9 784.99 DiseasesDB 5603 …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”