audioalgesic hallucination
   Also known as audioalgesic synaesthesia. Both terms are indebted to the Latin verb audire (to hear) and the Greek noun algos (pain). They were introduced in or shortly before 1979 by the American neurologists Daniel Enrique Jacome and Robert Jerome Gumnit to denote a "compound hallucination comprising an auditory component and a pain component.
   References
   Jacome, D.E., Gumnit, R.J. (1979). Audioalgesic and audiovisuoalgesic synesthesias: Epileptic manifestation. Neurology, 29, 1050-1053.

Dictionary of Hallucinations. . 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • audioalgesic synaesthesia —    see audioalgesic hallucination …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • compound hallucination —    Also known as multimodal hallucination, polymodal hallucination, polysensual hallucination, polysensory hallucination, polysensorial hallucination, intersensorial hallucination, and fantastic hallucination. All these terms are used to denote a …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • audiovisuoalgesic hallucination —    Also known as audiovisuoalgesic synaesthesia. Both terms are indebted to the Latin words audire (to hear) and visio (sight) and to the Greek noun algos (pain). They were introduced in or shortly before 1979 by the American neurologists Daniel… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

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