positive autoscopy
   The term positive autoscopy is indebted to the Greek words autos (self) and skopeo (I am looking at). It was introduced in or shortly before 1903 by the French physician and psychologist Paul Auguste Sollier (1861-1933). Sollier uses the adjective 'positive' to emphasize the perceived presence of a *double where none should be, and to distinguish this symptom from * negative autoscopy, a symptom characterized by the transient inability to perceive one's reflection in a mirror. Under the heading positive autoscopy, Sollier subsumes three subclasses, i.e. *specular autoscopy (an *autoscopic hallucination depicting one's exact mirror image), * dissimilar autoscopy (an autoscopic hallucination that is identified as one's self, even though it does not display one's exact physical characteristics), and * coenesthetic autoscopy (a double whose presence is sensed rather than perceived).
   References
   Sollier, P. (1903). Les phénomènes d'autoscopie. Paris: Félix Alcan.

Dictionary of Hallucinations. . 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • autoscopy —    The term autoscopy comes from the Greek words autos (self) and skopeô (I am looking at). It translates roughly as seeing oneself and is used to denote the act of perceiving a hallucinated mirror image of oneself, viewed from the position of… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • negative autoscopy —    Also known as negative heautoscopy and asomatoscopy. The term negative autoscopy is used to denote a variant of *autoscopy (i.e. the perception of a hallucinated image of oneself) characterized by the transient failure to perceive one s own… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • coenesthetic autoscopy —    Also written as cenesthetic autoscopy. Both terms are indebted to the medical Latin noun coenes thesis, which in turn comes from the Greek words koinos (communal) and aisthanesthai (to notice, to perceive). The term coenesthesis was used… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • dissimilar autoscopy —    The term dissimilar autoscopy comes from the Latin words dis (not) and similis (alike), and from the Greek words autos (self) and skopeo (I am looking at). The French term autoscopie dissemblable (i.e. dissimilar autoscopy) was introduced in… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • specular autoscopy —    Also known as specular hallucination. The term specular autoscopy is indebted to the Latin noun speglum (mirror) and the Greek words autos (self) and skopeo (I am looking at). It was introduced in or shortly before 1903 by the French physician …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

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