Pötzl phenomenon
   Also written as Poetzl phenomenon. The Pötzl phenomenon involves the reappearance in * dreams of words, images, and other types of information that were previously perceived in a subliminal way. The eponym Pötzl phenomenon refers to the Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist Otto Pötzl (1877-1962), who has been credited with describing the phenomenon in 1917.
   References
   Pötzl, O. (1917). Experimentell erregte Traumbilder in ihren Beziehungen zum indirekten Sehen. Zeitschrift für Neurologie und Psychiatrie, 37, 278-349.

Dictionary of Hallucinations. . 2010.

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