protéidolie
   The French term protéidolie is indebted to the Greek words protos (first) and eidos (image, appearance, idea). It was introduced in or shortly before 1973 by the French psychiatrist Henri Ey (1900-1977) to denote a variant of *hallucinotic eidolia (i.e. a hallucination occurring in the absence of disease) characterized by simple, yet intensely vivid images. As Ey maintains, "Pro-téidolies [are] a variety of hallucinotic eidolias characterized by a very vivid and elementary form ...and without a scenic interconnection". Ey uses the term protéidolie in opposition to the term * phantéidolie.
   References
   Ey, H. (1973). Traité des hallucinations. Tomes 1 et 2. Paris: Masson et Cie., Éditeurs.

Dictionary of Hallucinations. . 2010.

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  • phantéidolie —    The French term phantéidolie is indebted to the Greek words phantazestai (to imagine) and eidos (image, appearance, idea). It was introduced in or shortly before 1973 by the French psychiatrist Henri Ey (1900 1977) to denote a variant of *… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

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