psychotic hallucination
   The term psychotic hallucination is indebted to the medical Latin term * psychosis, which in turn stems from the Greek noun psuchosis (the giving of life, the process of animating). It is used to denote a hallucination which is attributable to an underlying * psychotic process or disorder. The term psychotic hallucination is used in opposition to terms such as * conversive hallucination (i.e. a hallucination that is attributable to * sensory conversion), * dissociative hallucination (one that is attributable to * dissociation), * organic hallucinosis (a hallucinatory state that is attributable to a * somatic condition), and * psychotic-like hallucination (a percept that is reminiscent of a * hallucination proper, but lacks one or more of the necessary formal characteristics). Conceptually, the term psychotic hallucination is not unambiguous. One reason for this is that at the clinical level ofdescription all hallucinations may be considered psychotic phenomena. As used in the term psychotic hallucination, however, the adjective psychotic refers to a causative level of description. This makes the term even more problematic, since pathophysiological notions such as psychosis, conversion, and dissociation are rather poorly validated, as is their relation to organic disease. Moreover, some studies suggest that the conceptual distinction between these purported mechanisms is not corroborated by the phenomenological characteristics of the ensuing types of hallucinations. For a discussion of this latter issue, see the entry Borderline personality disorder (BPD) and hallucinations.
   References
   Taylor, G.J. (2003). Somatization and conversion: Distinct or overlapping constructs? Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry, 31, 487-508.
   Yee, L., Korner, A.J., McSwiggan, S., Meares, R.A., Stevenson, J. (2005). Persistent hallucinosis in borderline personality disorder. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 46, 147-154.

Dictionary of Hallucinations. . 2010.

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