reduplicative phenomenon
   The term reduplicative phenomenon is indebted to the Latin noun reduplicare, which means to double. It is used as an umbrella term for a group of illusory perceptual phenomena characterized by the perseveration, reduplication, or reoccurrence of regular sense perceptions. Some examples of reduplicative phenomena are " visual perseveration (comprising the subgroups " illusory visual spread, " palinopsia, and the " trailing phenomenon), " palinacusis, " tactile polyaesthesia, "polyopia, and "entomopia.
   References
   Critchley, M. (1953). The parietal lobes. London: Edward Arnold & Co.

Dictionary of Hallucinations. . 2010.

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  • trailing phenomenon —    Also known as trailing effect and tracers. The first two terms were introduced in or shortly before 1971 by the American psychiatrist and addiction specialist Harvey Asher to denote a visual phenomenon which is associated with the (prior) use… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • autoscopic phenomenon —    Also known as phantom double. The expression autoscopic phenomenon comes from the Greek words autos (self) and skopeo (I am looking at). It translates roughly as a phenomenon that involves the seeing of oneself . The group of autoscopic… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

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  • visual perseveration —    Also known as perseveration. Both terms are indebted to the Latin verb perseverare,which means to maintain or to keep on stating. The term visual perseveration was introduced in or shortly before 1949 by the British neurologist Macdonald… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • tactile polyaesthesia —    Also known as palihaptic phenomenon, palinaesthesia, and perseverative somaesthetic sensation. The term tactile polyaesthesia comes from the Latin verb tangere (to touch), and the Greek words polus (much, many), and aisthanesthai (to notice,… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • illusory visual spread —    Also known as illusory visual perseveration. Both terms were introduced in or shortly before 1949 by the British neurologist Macdonald Critchley (1900 1997) to denote a type of visual perse veration characterized by the visual extension,… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • palinopsia —    Also referred to as pseudodiplopia. The term palinopsia comes from the Greek words palin (again) and opsis (seeing). It translates as seeing again or seeing multiple identical copies . The original term for this group of visual phenomena was * …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • polyopia —    Also known as polyopsia. Both terms stem from the Greek words polus (much, many) and opsis (seeing). They refer to the perception of an image that repeats itself within the visual field. The ensuing coexistence of various similar images within …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

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  • Reduplication — in linguistics is a morphological process in which the root or stem of a word (or part of it) is repeated exactly or with a slight change. Reduplication is used in inflections to convey a grammatical function, such as plurality, intensification,… …   Wikipedia

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