sensorial hallucination
   Also known as psychic hallucination. The term sensorial hallucination is indebted to the Latin noun sensorium, which means seat of the senses, or brain. It was used in 1846 by the French dream researcher Maurice Macario to denote a hallucination which the affected individual takes to be an ordinary sense perception, even though it is mediated by chemical changes or "nerve fibre vibrations" in the brain. Macario's concept ofthe sensorial hallucination would seem to fit in with the * centrifugal theory of hallucinatory activity. The term was used by him in opposition to the terms * ganglionic hallucination, * intuitive hallucination, and * sthenic hallucination.
   References
   Macario, M. (1846). Des rêves considérés sous le rapport physiologique et pathologique. Annales Médico-psychologiques, VIII, 170-218.

Dictionary of Hallucinations. . 2010.

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  • psychic hallucination —    Also known as psychical hallucination, mental hallucination, conception hallucination, and sensorial hallucination. The term psychic hallucination is indebted to the Greek noun psuchè (life breath, spirit, soul, mind). It was introduced in or… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • incomplete hallucination —    The term incomplete hallucination is used to denote a hallucination that lacks one or more of the formal characteristics of the full blown perceptual phenomenon. For example, the term is used to denote a visual hallucination that lacks the… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • complete hallucination —    A term used to denote a hallucination fulfilling all the formal characteristics of * hallucinations proper, in the sense that it perfectly mimics a regular sense perception. The French psychiatrist Pierre Lelong conceptualizes complete… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • ganglionic hallucination —    The term ganglionic hallucination is indebted to the Greek noun gagglion (i.e. ganglion), which refers to a collection of nerve cells acting as a centre of neurotransmission. It was introduced by the 19th century French dream researcher… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • intuitive hallucination —    The term intuitive hallucination is indebted to the Latin noun intuitus, which means sight, the looking at . It was used, and possibly also introduced, by the 19th century French dream researcher Maurice Macario to denote a hallucination not… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • psychosensorial hallucination —    The notion of the hallucination psycho sensorielle was proposed in 1846 by the French alienist Jules Gabriel François Baillarger (1806 1891) to the French Academy of Medicine. Baillarger used the term to denote a type of hallucination which… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • sthenic hallucination —    The term sthenic hallucination is indebted to the Greek noun sthenos, which means force. It was coined in or shortly before 1846 by the French dream researcher Maurice Macario to denote a hallucination that results from a heightened… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • centrifugal theory of hallucinatory activity —    The centrifugal theory is an explanatory model of hallucinatory activity which is traditionally attributed to the German physiologist and zoologist Johannes Peter Müller (1801 1858). The centrifugal theory suggests that subcortical and/or… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

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