sthenic hallucination
   The term sthenic hallucination is indebted to the Greek noun sthenos, which means force. It was coined in or shortly before 1846 by the French dream researcher Maurice Macario to denote a hallucination that results from a heightened sensibility of the perceptual system. In opting for this term, Macario was seeking to designate such phenomena as the * visual hallucinations of cogwheels and other parts experienced by watchmakers and the * auditory hallucinations of cooking sounds familiar to professional cooks. He used the term sthenic hallucination in opposition to * sensorial hallucination, * intuitive hallucination, and * ganglionic hallucination.
   References
   Macario, M. (1846). Des rêves considérés sous le rapport physiologique et pathologique. Annales Médico-psychologiques, VIII, 170-218.

Dictionary of Hallucinations. . 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • sensorial hallucination —    Also known as psychic hallucination. The term sensorial hallucination is indebted to the Latin noun sensorium, which means seat of the senses, or brain. It was used in 1846 by the French dream researcher Maurice Macario to denote a… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • ganglionic hallucination —    The term ganglionic hallucination is indebted to the Greek noun gagglion (i.e. ganglion), which refers to a collection of nerve cells acting as a centre of neurotransmission. It was introduced by the 19th century French dream researcher… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • intuitive hallucination —    The term intuitive hallucination is indebted to the Latin noun intuitus, which means sight, the looking at . It was used, and possibly also introduced, by the 19th century French dream researcher Maurice Macario to denote a hallucination not… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

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