verbal hallucination
   Also known as phonemic hallucination. The origin of the term verbal hallucination is unknown, but it was used by classic authors such as the French psychiatrist Louis Jules Ernest Séglas (1856-1939) and the German neurologist and psychiatrist Kurt Goldstein (1878-1965) to denote a hallucination conveying words, either in an audible form (as in the * verbal auditory hallucination), an inaudible form (as in the * psychomotor verbal hallucination), an actual spoken form (i.e. the *motor hallucination), or a written form (i.e. the * visual verbal hallucination). Goldstein conceptualizes speech as consisting of an auditory component and a motor component, which may be activated either simultaneously or separately. Today the term verbal hallucination is used sometimes in a rather loose sense as an equivalent for the term verbal auditory hallucination. It features prominently in the 1974 Present State Examination (PSE) schedule. The PSE lists as subclasses of the verbal hallucination the * affective (or non-specific) verbal hallucination, and the *non-affective verbal hallucination. The term verbal hallucination is used in opposition to the term *nonverbal hallucination.
   References
   Goldstein, K. (1908). Zur Theorie der Hallucina-tionen. Studien über normale und pathologische Wahrnehmung. Archiv für Psychiatrie und Nervenkrankheiten, 44, 1036-1106.
   Séglas, J. (1892). Des troubles du langage chez les aliénés. Paris: J. Rueffet Cie.
   Wing, J.K., Cooper, J.E., Sartorius, N. (1974). The measurement and classification of psychiatric symptoms. An instruction manual for the PSE and Catego Program. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Dictionary of Hallucinations. . 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • auditory verbal hallucination — (AVH)    Also known as verbal auditory hallucination, voice hallucination, *phoneme, hallucinated speech, and voices . The term auditory verbal hallucination (AVH) is often used as a synonym for verbal auditory hallucination (VAH), both terms… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • visual verbal hallucination —    Also known as logopsia, graphic hallucination, graphic speech hallucination, and visual speech hallucination. The French term hallucination verbale visuelle (i.e. visual verbal hallucination) was introduced in or shortly before 1888 by the… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • non-affective verbal hallucination —    A term featuring in the 1974 Present State Examination (PSE) schedule, developed by the British psychiatrists John Kenneth Wing et al. As defined in the PSE, the notion of non affective verbal hallucination may refer to two distinct types of… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • affective or non-specific verbal hallucination —    A term featuring in the 1974 Present State Examination (PSE) schedule, developed by the British psychiatrists John Kenneth Wing et al. As defined in the PSE, the expression affective or nonspecific verbal hallucination refers to a variant of… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • non-specific verbal hallucination —    see affective or non specific verbal hallucination …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • psychomotor verbal hallucination —    see psychomotor hallucination …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • motor verbal hallucination —    see subvocalization …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • muscular verbal hallucination —    see subvocalization …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • verbal auditory hallucination — (VAH)    Also known as auditory verbal hallucination, voice hallucination, phoneme, hallucinated speech, and voices . All five terms are used to denote a subclass of the group of *auditory hallucinations, the content of which is verbal in nature …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • verbal impulse —    The French term impulsion verbale was introduced in or shortly before 1888 by the French psychiatrist Louis Jules Ernest Séglas (18561939) to denote a type of *psychic hallucination. Under the heading ofverbal impulses Séglas subsumed such… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

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