coenesthetic autoscopy
   Also written as cenesthetic autoscopy. Both terms are indebted to the medical Latin noun coenes-thesis, which in turn comes from the Greek words koinos (communal) and aisthanesthai (to notice, to perceive). The term coenesthesis was used during the era of classic psychiatry to denote the 'common sensation' or 'common general sensibility' arising from the sum of all bodily sense impressions. (For a further explanation of the term coenesthesis, see the entry Coenesthetic hallucination.) The term autoscopie cénesthétique or coenesthetic autoscopy was introduced in 1903 by the French physician and psychologist Paul Auguste Sollier (1861-1933) to denote a phenomenon characterized by the * sensed presence of one's * double rather than its hallucinated presence. Thus individuals suffering from coenesthetic autoscopy have the intuitive feeling that a doppelgänger is present in their immediate surroundings. Sollier classified coen-esthetic autoscopy as a variant of *positive autoscopy. The notion ofcoenesthetic autoscopy should not be confused with the notions of *coenesthetic hallucination, *coenesthesiopathy, and * acenesthesia.
   References
   Sollier, P. (1903). Les phénomènes d'autoscopie. Paris: Félix Alcan.

Dictionary of Hallucinations. . 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • autoscopy —    The term autoscopy comes from the Greek words autos (self) and skopeô (I am looking at). It translates roughly as seeing oneself and is used to denote the act of perceiving a hallucinated mirror image of oneself, viewed from the position of… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • coenesthetic hallucination —    Also written as cenesthetic hallucination. Both terms translate loosely to hallucination of auto somatic awareness . They are used to denote a * somatic hallucination consisting of a peculiar visceral or other bodily sensation that cannot be… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • positive autoscopy —    The term positive autoscopy is indebted to the Greek words autos (self) and skopeo (I am looking at). It was introduced in or shortly before 1903 by the French physician and psychologist Paul Auguste Sollier (1861 1933). Sollier uses the… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • specular autoscopy —    Also known as specular hallucination. The term specular autoscopy is indebted to the Latin noun speglum (mirror) and the Greek words autos (self) and skopeo (I am looking at). It was introduced in or shortly before 1903 by the French physician …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • internal autoscopy —    Also known as internal heautoscopy, inner heautoscopy, organic auto representation, and auto representative phenomenon. The term internal autoscopy was introduced in or shortly before 1903 by the French physician and psychologist Paul Auguste… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • external autoscopy —    A term introduced in or shortly before 1903 by the French physician and psychologist Paul Auguste Sollier (1861 1933) to denote a type of autoscopy (i.e. seeing one self) characterized by a visual or compound hallucination depicting the body s …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • acenesthesia —    Also known as acoenesthesiopathy, general elementary somatopsychosis, and asomatognosia. The term acenesthesia comes from the Greek words a (not), koinos (communal), and aisthanesthai (to notice, to perceive). It translates loosely as not… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

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