complicated metamorphopsia
   The term complicated metamorphopsia comes from the Latin verb complicare (to fold together), and the Greek words metamorphoun (to change the form) and opsis (seeing). It is used to denote a type of *metamorphopsia (i.e. a visual distortion) that is accompanied by an alteration in the affective tone of one's experience of the extracorpo-real environment, analogous to cases of*kalopsia or *kakopsia (i.e. seeing things as beautiful or ugly, respectively). The term complicated meta-morphopsia is used in opposition to the term * simple metamorphopsia.
   References
   Critchley, M. (1953). The parietal lobes. London: Edward Arnold & Co.
   Willanger, R., Klee, A. (1966). Metamorphop-sia and other visual disturbances with latency occurring in patients with diffuse cerebral lesions. Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, 42, 1-18.

Dictionary of Hallucinations. . 2010.

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  • metamorphopsia —    The term metamorphopsia comes from the Greek words metamorphoun (to change the form) and opsis (seeing). It translates roughly as seeing an altered form . It is not clear who introduced the term, but it appears in a medical lexicon as early as …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • simple metamorphopsia —    The term simple metamorphopsia comes from the Latin adjective simplex (simple) and the Greek words metamorphoun (to change the form) and opsis (seeing). It is used to denote a type of * metamorphopsia (i.e. a visual distortion) that is not… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

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