algopsychalia
   Also known as psychalgia, phrenalgia, mind pain, soul pain, psychic pain, and psychogenic pain. The term algopsychalia comes from the Greek words algos (pain) and psuchè (life breath, spirit, soul, mind). It translates loosely as 'mental pain'. It refers to a bodily sensation of pain that is recognized by the individual as being mental rather than physical in origin. Algopsychalia tends to be classified as a *psychogenic hallucination or as a variant of * sensory conversion. Conceptually, it is related to * hallucinated pain. However, it should not be confused with pain syndromes such as *allodynia, *dysaesthesia, *paraesthesia, and * hyperpathia.
   References
   VandenBos, G.R., ed. (2007). APA dictionary of psychology. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Dictionary of Hallucinations. . 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • allodynia —    The term allodynia comes from the Greek words allos (other) and odunè (pain), translating loosely to other pain . It is used to denote a condition characterized by pain due to a stimulus that does not normally evoke pain. Patho physiologically …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • mind pain —    see algopsychalia …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • phrenalgia —    see algopsychalia …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • psychalgia —    see algopsychalia …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • psychic pain —    see algopsychalia …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • psychogenic hallucination —    The term psychogenic hallucination is indebted to the medical Latin term * psychosis, which in turn comes from the Greek noun psuchosis (the giving of life, the process of animating). It translates loosely as a hallucination created by the… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • psychogenic pain —    see algopsychalia …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • soul pain —    see algopsychalia …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

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