allachaesthesia
   Also known as allachesthesia, allesthesia, allaesthesia, allochaesthesia, allochesthesia, alloesthesia, and atopognosis. The term allachaesthesia comes from the Greek words allache (elsewhere) and aisthanesthai (to notice, to perceive). It translates loosely as 'perception in a different place' and refers to a mislocation of tactile sensations to a location other than the one that is actually being touched. The term allachaesthesia was introduced in or shortly before 1894 by the British neurologist Thomas Grainger Stewart (1877—1957) to denote horizontal or diagonal displacements of localization for touch confined to the ipsilat-eral side of the body. Stewart noted that this phenomenon bore a resemblance to *allochiria (i.e. a condition characterized by a mislocation of sensory stimuli to the corresponding opposite half of the body). Today allochiria is generally considered a variant or subset of the class allachaesthesia. Two variants of allachaesthesia that occur in other sensory modalities are gustatory allachaesthesia and * visual allachaesthesia. Another condition phenomenologically related to allachaesthesia is * spinal cord damage-induced synaesthesia. It is unlikely, however, that the two phenomena are related in a pathophysiological sense as well. A condition in which unilateral stimulation produces bilateral tactile sensations is called * synchiria.
   References
   Stewart, T.G. (1894). A clinical lecture on a case of perverted localisation of sensation or allachaesthesia. British Medical Journal,1, 1—4.
   Meador, K.J., Allen, M.E., Adams, R.J., Loring, D.W. (1991). Allochiria vs allesthesia. Is there a misperception? Archives of Neurology, 48, 546—549.

Dictionary of Hallucinations. . 2010.

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  • visual allachaesthesia —    Also known as optical allachaesthesia, optical alloaesthesia, and fata morgana of the visual sphere. The first three expressions are indebted to the Greek words attache (elsewhere) and aisthanesthai (to notice, to perceive). They translate… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • optical allachaesthesia —    see visual allachaesthesia …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • allochiria —    Also known as allocheiria. Both terms stem from the Greek words allos (other) and cheir (hand), translating loosely to other hand . The term allochiria was introduced in or shortly before 1882 by the Austrian neuroanatomist and… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • phantom alloaesthesia —    Also known as phantom alloaesthesic sensation. Both terms stem from the Greek words phantasma (ghost, spectre), allos (other), and aisthanesthai (to notice, to perceive). They are used to denote a variant of alloaesthesia (i.e.… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • allesthesia —    see allachaesthesia …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • alloesthesia —    see allachaesthesia …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • atopognosis —    see allachaesthesia …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • fata morgana —    Fata morgana is Italian for mirage. The eponym is derived from Morgan le Fay, the name of King Arthur s half sister, a fairy and shape shifter who features in the Legend of the Grail.The term fata morgana is used to denote a complex type of… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • fata morgana of the visual sphere —    see visual allachaesthesia …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • inverted vision —    Also known as reversal of vision metamorphopsia. The term inverted vision comes from the Latin words inverto (to turn around, to change) and visio (seeing). It is used to denote a rare visual phenomenon in which objects of fixation, and… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

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