hallucinotic eidolia
   The term hallucinotic eidolia is indebted to the Greek noun eidos, which means image, appearance, idea. It translates loosely as 'hallucination-like image'. The French neologism éidolie hallucinosique was introduced in or shortly before 1973 by the French psychiatrist Henri Ey (1900-1977) to denote a hallucination with a limited duration which manifests itself in a limited part of the perceptual field, typically in the absence of pathology. An example of hallucinotic eidolia is a visual hallucination occurring in the context of * Charles Bonnet syndrome. Given its emphasis on the benign nature of hallucinations such as these, Ey's notion of hallucinotic eidolia bears a certain similarity to the notion of * benign hallucination as formulated by the American psychiatrist Gordon Forrer. In his Traité des Hallucinations, Ey proposes the term éidolie hallucinosique as a substitute for hallucinosis - that is to say, for the term hallucinosis as used by his compatriot Henri Charles Jules Claude (1869-1946) and the German psychiatrist Paul Schröder (1873-1941), both of whom regarded it as a hallucination occurring in the absence of pathology. Ey's desire to propose the new term éidolie hallu-cinosique stemmed from his observation that the term hallucinosis had too many different connotations and from a desire to distinguish between pathological hallucinations (which he referred to as * hallucinations délirantes, or simply hallucinations), and phenomenologically similar percepts occurring in the absence of disease. Ey distinguishes two types oféidolieshallucinosiques, which he calls * phantéidolies and * protéidolies. He uses a related term, *somato-éidolie, to denote what is generally known as a * body schema illusion.
   References
   Ey, H. (1973). Traité des hallucinations. Tomes 1 et 2. Paris: Masson et Cie., Éditeurs.
   Wertheimer, J. (1992). Some hypotheses about the genesis ofvisual hallucinations in dementias. In: Delusions and hallucinations in old age. Edited by Katona, C., Levy, R. London: Gaskell.

Dictionary of Hallucinations. . 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • eidolia —    see hallucinotic eidolia …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • phantéidolie —    The French term phantéidolie is indebted to the Greek words phantazestai (to imagine) and eidos (image, appearance, idea). It was introduced in or shortly before 1973 by the French psychiatrist Henri Ey (1900 1977) to denote a variant of *… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • protéidolie —    The French term protéidolie is indebted to the Greek words protos (first) and eidos (image, appearance, idea). It was introduced in or shortly before 1973 by the French psychiatrist Henri Ey (1900 1977) to denote a variant of *hallucinotic… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • hallucinosis —    A term coined in or shortly before 1900, possibly by the German neurologist Carl Wernicke (1848 1904), to denote a mental state or disorder in which hallucinations feature prominently. The term hallucinosis has been variously defined as    1)… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

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