idiopathic autoscopy
   The term idiopathic autoscopy comes from the Greek words idiopatheia (affliction of a local origin), autos (self), and skopeo (I am looking at). It is used to denote a type of "autoscopy (i.e. 'seeing oneself') not attributable to an organic disorder. The term is used in opposition to "symptomatic autoscopy. For a further explanation, see the entries Autoscopy, Autoscopic phenomenon, and Autoscopic hallucination.
   References
   Campbell, R.J. (1996). Psychiatric dictionary. Seventh edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Dictionary of Hallucinations. . 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • autoscopy —    The term autoscopy comes from the Greek words autos (self) and skopeô (I am looking at). It translates roughly as seeing oneself and is used to denote the act of perceiving a hallucinated mirror image of oneself, viewed from the position of… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • symptomatic autoscopy —    The term symptomatic autoscopy comes from the Greek words sumptoma (chance, disease), autos (self), and skopeo (I am looking at). It is used to denote a type of * autoscopy (i.e. seeing oneself ) which is attributable to an organic disorder.… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

  • autoscopic phenomenon —    Also known as phantom double. The expression autoscopic phenomenon comes from the Greek words autos (self) and skopeo (I am looking at). It translates roughly as a phenomenon that involves the seeing of oneself . The group of autoscopic… …   Dictionary of Hallucinations

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”